Sample Plans of Study (M.S.E.)

View  overviews, courses and research activities for each of the plans of study.

  • Control systems [PDF]
  • Electromagnetics, antennas and microwave circuits [PDF]
  • Electronic and mixed-signal circuit design [PDF]
  • Electric power and energy systems [PDF]
  • Physical electronics and photonics (formerly Solid-state electronics) [PDF]
  • Signal processing and communications [PDF]
  • Arts, media and engineering

Focus Areas Overviews

Control systems

OVERVIEW

The Systems and Controls program includes nine graduate courses in the areas of linear and nonlinear control systems, real-time and digital control systems, optimal control, distributed parameter systems, adaptive control and neural networks. In addition, the theoretical material taught in the upper division undergraduate and graduate courses is enhanced through the use of computer and experimental projects.

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Electromagnetics, antennas and microwave circuits

OVERVIEW

The electromagnetics, antennas and microwave circuits curriculum includes undergraduate and graduate courses in the areas of engineering electromagnetics, antennas, microwave circuits and devices, fiber optics and lasers.  Many of the upper division undergraduate and graduate courses make use of state-of-art simulation software, both personal and commercial,  and experimental facilities to enhance the theoretical material taught in the courses.  The graduate research program is supplemented by the Electromagnetic Anechoic Chamber, Millimeter-Wave Antenna Measurement Facility, Microwave Fabrication Facility, Microwave Characterization Laboratory, Electromagnetics Graphics Laboratory and Electronic Packaging Laboratory, and the Applied Electromagnetic Structures & Interaction Laboratory.

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Electronic and mixed signal circuit design

OVERVIEW

The School of Electrical, Computer and Energy Engineering at Arizona State University has a strong research program in electronic and mixed-signal circuit design. The curriculum includes five upper-division undergraduate courses and over 10 graduate-level courses in the area. This is an interdisciplinary group involving faculty in the Connection One Research Center and the Center for Solid-State Electronics Research (CSSER).

With the support of semiconductor industry and government agencies, these centers have established a state-of-the-art educational program in VLSI design, modeling, mixed-signal and radio-frequency (RF) integrated circuits design.

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Electric power and energy systems

OVERVIEW

The electric power and energy systems curriculum in the School of Electrical, Computer and Energy Engineering includes eight upper-division undergraduate and sixteen graduate courses in the area of power system analysis, power generation, transmission and distribution, power system dynamics and stability, energy conversion, electric machines, power electronics, high voltage engineering, energy markets, computer applications and nuclear power engineering. An undergraduate power laboratory supports the teaching of energy conversion. A relay protection and power electronics laboratory provides hands-on experience in the field of electrical power supplies, drives and network protection systems. The graduate research program is supported by the Power System Computational Laboratory, the High Voltage Laboratory, Insulation Laboratory, Advanced Power Electronics Laboratories and Power Plant Diagnostics Laboratory. In addition, the use of computers is integrated into all of the upper division undergraduate and graduate courses to enhance the theoretical material taught in the courses.

ASU is the lead university in the Power Systems Engineering Research Center (PSERC), an industrially and federally supported program of industry/university cooperation. Students are exposed to industrial projects, professional society meetings, laboratory experience and research partially supported by PSERC. More information about PSERC may be found at http://www.pserc.org

The ASU power engineering program is part of a NSF-funded engineering research center, the Future Renewable Electric Energy Distribution Management (FREEDM) center. The FREEDM center deals with the use of solid state controllers and devices to implement a “next generation” power distribution system, including distributed energy resources.

MSE and MS Power student course selection guide

 

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Physical electronics and photonics (formerly Solid state electronics)

OVERVIEW

The physical electronics and photonics curriculum includes five upper-division undergraduate and 21 graduate courses in the areas of semiconductor devices and materials, micro-electro-mechanical-systems (MEMS), characterization, semiconductor optoelectronics, photonic and photovoltaic devices, solar energy, semiconductor processing, nanoelectronics, nanophotonics, molecular electronics, transport and computational electronics, as well as occasional specialty courses. Several classes offer a hands-on laboratory experience during which students work in a cleanroom environment and other specialized labs using industry-standard fabrication and characterization tools.

Many of our Master’s and Ph.D.  students are supported by research assistantships sponsored by industry or federal agencies such as the National Science Foundation, NASA, DARPA, research offices of the Air Force, Army and Navy, the National Institutes of Health among others. Graduate students who elect to complete a research thesis will often work with physical electronics and photonics faculty as part of large projects consisting of multi-university teams such as the QESST Engineering Research Center (http://qesst.asu.edu) sponsored by the National Science Foundation and the U.S. Department of Energy. Graduate experimental research projects in solid state electronics are enabled by the ASU NanoFab (http://more.engineering.asu.edu/nanofab/) which serves as the southwest regional node of the National Nanotechnology Infrastructure Network (www.nnin.org)

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Signal processing and communications

OVERVIEW

The School of Electrical, Computer and Energy Engineering at Arizona State University offers instruction in the related areas of signal processing and communications systems (SP/Comm) at the graduate level. Courses are also offered for beginning graduate students in the SP/Comm area to bridge any gaps that might exist between their undergraduate course work and the 500-level offerings at ASU. Students may choose from among several 500-level courses ranging from offerings primarily intended for first-year students to special topics courses designed to acquaint advanced graduate students with research topics of current interest.

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Arts, media and engineering

OVERVIEW

The School of Electrical, Computer and Energy Engineering at Arizona State University in collaboration with the Herberger College of Fine Arts (HFCA) has established a concentration in Arts, Media and Engineering. This concentration is available both for master’s and doctoral programs (not available for M.S.E or M.Eng.). Students admitted in this program take two-thirds of their course, research, and thesis credits from the School of Electrical, Computer and Energy Engineering and one-third of the credits from the Arts, Media and Engineering program.  For more information on the Arts, Media and Engineering concentration visit the Frequently Asked Questions about the ECEE + AME Concentration page.

 

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