Sample plans of study

Scroll down to view  overviews, courses and research activities for each of the plans of study.

  • Control systems
  • Electromagnetics, antennas and microwave circuits
  • Electronic and mixed-signal circuit design
  • Electric power and energy systems
  • Signal processing and communications
  • Solid-state electronics
  • Arts, media and engineering

control systems

Revised 4/26/2013

OVERVIEW

The Systems and Controls program includes nine graduate courses in the areas of linear and nonlinear control systems, real-time and digital control systems, optimal control, distributed parameter systems, adaptive control and neural networks. In addition, the theoretical material taught in the upper division undergraduate and graduate courses is enhanced through the use of computer and experimental projects.

Sample MSE iPOS Control systems

ELECTIVE COURSES

EEE 480 – Feedback Systems
EEE 481 - Computer Controlled Systems

GRADUATE COURSES

EEE 511 – Artificial Neural Computation Systems
EEE 550 – Transform Theory and Applications
EEE 554 – Random Signal Theory I
EEE 581 – Filtering of Stochastic Processes
EEE 582 – Linear System Theory
EEE 586 – Nonlinear Control Systems
EEE 587 – Optimal Control
EEE 588 – Design of Linear Multivariable Control Systems
EEE 686 – Adaptive Control Theory

RESEARCH ACTIVITIES

The control systems program concentrates on doctoral education sponsored by various federal and private sources. Most of the doctoral students receive financial support in the form of research assistantships or fellowships. Recent sponsored projects include

  • Modeling, Analysis, Control and Design of Scramjet-Powered Hypersonic Vehicles and of Micro-Air Vehicles
  • Modeling, Analysis and Policy Decision Making for Renewable Resource Systems
  • Epileptogenic Focus Localization and Closed-loop Control of Brain Dynamics in Epilepsy
  • Wastewater Treatment Using Microbial Fuel Cells with Peroxide Production
  • Cortical neural correlates to attention and control
  • Dynamic organization of motor cortical neural activities in learning control tasks

electromagnetics, antennas and microwave circuits

Revised 4/16/13

OVERVIEW

The electromagnetics, antennas and microwave circuits curriculum includes undergraduate and graduate courses in the areas of engineering electromagnetics, antennas, microwave circuits and devices, fiber optics and lasers.  Many of the upper division undergraduate and graduate courses make use of state-of-art simulation software, both personal and commercial,  and experimental facilities to enhance the theoretical material taught in the courses.  The graduate research program is supplemented by the Electromagnetic Anechoic Chamber, Millimeter-Wave Antenna Measurement Facility, Microwave Fabrication Facility, Microwave Characterization Laboratory, Electromagnetics Graphics Laboratory and Electronic Packaging Laboratory, and the Applied Electromagnetic Structures & Interaction Laboratory.

Sample MSE iPOS Electromagnetics, antennas and microwave circuits

ELECTIVE COURSES

EEE 443 – Antennas for Wireless Communications
EEE 445 – Microwaves
EEE 448 – Fiber Optics

GRADUATE COURSES

EEE 540 – Fast Computational Electromagnetics
EEE 541 – Electromagnetic Fields and Guided Waves
EEE 543 – Antenna Analysis and Design
EEE 544 – High Resolution Radar
EEE 545 – Microwave Circuit Design
EEE 546 – Advanced Fiber Optics
EEE 547 – Microwave Solid-State Circuit Design I
EEE 548 – Coherent Optics
EEE 549 – Lasers
EEE 641 – Advanced Electromagnetic Field Theory
EEE 643 – Advanced Topics in Electromagnetic Radiation
EEE 647 – Microwave Solid-State Circuit Design

RESEARCH ACTIVITIES

The faculty in the electromagnetics group are involved in research on many areas of applied electromagnetics, including:  smart antennas; beamforming and steering techniques; flexible antennas; miniature, conformal, low-profile, wideband and reconfigurable antennas; tunable and reconfigurable microwave circuits; RF micro-electro-mechanical systems; biomedical applications; nanophotonics and nanostructural materials;  metamaterials; planar and conformal electromagnetics band-gap (EBG)  structures; and fast computational electromagnetic methods.

Sponsors of the electromagnetics, antennas and microwave circuits research program include the National Science Foundation, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, National Institutes of Health, Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, Army Research Office, Office of Naval Research,  NAVAIR, Engineering Foundation, Sandia National Laboratories, Northrop Grumman, Raytheon, local, regional and national industry and the Advanced Helicopter Electromagnetics (AHE) Industrial Associates Program — a unique research consortium encompassing ASU as well as several government agencies and helicopter companies.

electronic and mixed signal circuit design

Revised 4/18/2013

OVERVIEW

The School of Electrical, Computer and Energy Engineering at Arizona State University has a strong research program in electronic and mixed-signal circuit design. The curriculum includes five upper-division undergraduate courses and over 10 graduate-level courses in the area. This is an interdisciplinary group involving faculty in the Connection One Research Center and the Center for Solid-State Electronics Research (CSSER).

With the support of semiconductor industry and government agencies, these centers have established a state-of-the-art educational program in VLSI design, modeling, mixed-signal and radio-frequency (RF) integrated circuits design.

Sample MSE iPOS Electronic and mixed-signal circuit design

ELECTRONIC AND MIXED-SIGNAL CIRCUIT DESIGN COURSES

EEE 425 – Digital Systems and Circuits
EEE 433 – Analog Integrated Circuits
EEE 523 – Advanced Analog Integrated Circuits
EEE 524 – Communication Transceiver Circuits Design
EEE 525 – VLSI Design
EEE 526 – VLSI Architectures
EEE 527 – Analog-to-Digital Converters
EEE 528 – Introduction to Microelectromechanical Systems
EEE 598 – RF Test
EEE 598 – Switched Capacitor Circuit Design
EEE 598 – Serial Links
EEE 598 – Low Power Bioelectronics
EEE 598 – Technology Computer Aided Design
EEE 598 – Analog Interface of MEMS
EEE 598 – Nano/Micro Electromechanical Sensors
EEE 625 – Advanced VLSI Design
EEE 627 – Oversampling Sigma-Delta Data Converters

RF AND MICROWAVE COURSES

EEE 425 – Digital Systems and Circuits
EEE 433 – Analog Integrated Circuits
EEE 445 – Microwaves
EEE 525 – VLSI Design
EEE 545 – Microwave Circuit Design
EEE 547 – Microwave Solid-State Circuit Design I
EEE 647 – Microwave Solid-State Circuit Design II

electric power and energy systems

Revised 4/18/2013

OVERVIEW

The electric power and energy systems curriculum in the School of Electrical, Computer and Energy Engineering includes eight upper-division undergraduate and sixteen graduate courses in the area of power system analysis, power generation, transmission and distribution, power system dynamics and stability, energy conversion, electric machines, power electronics, high voltage engineering, energy markets, computer applications and nuclear power engineering. An undergraduate power laboratory supports the teaching of energy conversion. A relay protection and power electronics laboratory provides hands-on experience in the field of electrical power supplies, drives and network protection systems. The graduate research program is supported by the Power System Computational Laboratory, the High Voltage Laboratory, Insulation Laboratory, Advanced Power Electronics Laboratories and Power Plant Diagnostics Laboratory. In addition, the use of computers is integrated into all of the upper division undergraduate and graduate courses to enhance the theoretical material taught in the courses.

ASU is the lead university in the Power Systems Engineering Research Center (PSERC), an industrially and federally supported program of industry/university cooperation. Students are exposed to industrial projects, professional society meetings, laboratory experience and research partially supported by PSERC. More information about PSERC may be found at http://www.pserc.org

The ASU power engineering program is part of a NSF-funded engineering research center, the Future Renewable Electric Energy Distribution Management (FREEDM) center. The FREEDM center deals with the use of solid state controllers and devices to implement a “next generation” power distribution system, including distributed energy resources.

MSE and MS Power student course selection guide

Sample iPOS Power and energy systems

COURSES

UNDERGRADUATE

EEE 360  – Energy System and Power Electronics
EEE 460  – Nuclear Power Engineering
EEE 463  – Electrical Power Plants
EEE 470  – Electric Power Devices
EEE 471  – Power System Analyses
EEE 472  – Power Electronics & Power Management
EEE 473  – Electrical Machinery
EEE 498  – Health Physics

GRADUATE

EEE 562 – Nuclear Reactor Theory and Design
EEE 563 – Nuclear Reactor System Dynamics and Diagnostics
EEE 564 – Interdisciplinary Nuclear Power Operations
EEE 571 – Power System Transients
EEE 572 – Advanced Power Electronics
EEE 573 – Electric Power Quality
EEE 574 – Computer Solution of Power System
EEE 575 – Power System Stability
EEE 576 – Power System Dynamics
EEE 577 – Power System Operation and Planning
EEE 579 – Transmission  and Distribution
EEE 598 –Renewable Electric. Energy System
EEE 598 –Electric Energy Markets
EEE 598–High Power Converters and Drive Systems
EEE 598–Cyber Security and Privacy in Smart Grid
EEE 598–Operations Research Applied to Electric Power Systems

RESEARCH ACTIVITIES

The power program concentrates on master’s level and PhD education, which is sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), National Science Foundation, national laboratories, power utilities and private industry. Center for the Advanced Control of Energy and Power Systems sponsors research in electric power quality and control of power systems. Particularly close cooperation has been developed with the local utilities: Salt River Project and Arizona Public Service Company. The yearly industrial support is around $1 million, and the faculty and students publish journal and conference papers. Most of the doctoral students receive financial support in the form of research or teaching assistantships. The research effort is focused in the following areas:

Power Electronics

The power electronics group focuses on research on high performance, switch mode power converters and control for a wide range of applications including voltage regulators for modern microprocessors, compact power supplies for space applications, motor drives with high performance PWM techniques, solid state transformers, power converters for renewable energy resources, high power converters for utility-scale applications and power electronic control of power systems.  We work on developing new topologies, control methods and PWM techniques to enhance the efficiency, power density, power quality and dynamic performance  of the converters used in these and other emerging applications.

Recently, a major research emphasis of our group has been on modeling, control and design of PWM power converters for enabling very high grid penetration of renewable resources – mainly distributed PV, wind and emerging smart grid concepts including solar residential microgrids enabled by universal power management systems and distributed energy storage. 

High Voltage Engineering and Dielectric Studies

Study of the aging process in insulating materials, prediction of their life expectancy, investigation of flashover mechanisms in polluted insulator surfaces, study non-ceramic insulators behavior in different environment are the major part of the research in this area. Another important activities are field studies on insulation systems (ceramic and non-ceramic) ,investigation of protective insulator coatings and. studies on polymeric cable terminations.

Recent work concentrated on corona formation under different environmental conditions, high electric field caused aging of fiber optic cables, brittle fracture of composite insulators, experimental investigation of creepage breakdown, the barrier effect on breakdown voltage, development of new flashover theory together with the invention of a new material screening technique.

Power Systems Analysis and Computation

Research is conducted to develop better algorithms and computational tools for power systems analysis for a wide range of applications including, power system stability, novel power flow methods, short circuit studies, sparsity techniques, network equivalenceing, power system optimization, parameter estimation, state estimation, computational issue in optimizing long-term generation and transmission line expansion, parallel and vector computing, optimal ground-grid design, transformer thermal modeling, structure-preserving system modeling. Recent research includes optimal dynamic transformer loading under emergency conditions, dc-network modeling for planning, operations and market studies, optimization methods for developing optimal structure-preserving network models. Additional work concentrates on research in power distribution, particularly on control methods, solid state devices in distribution engineering and distributed renewable resources, which are conducted by the FREEDM center.

Research in power system stability and dynamics include impact of renewable resources on power system dynamic performance, modeling and analysis of single phase low inertia inductions motors to study fault induced delayed voltage recovery, and utilization of synchrophasor measurements for dynamic security assessment.

Power Generation

Development of advanced diagnostic methods applied to power generation facilities. These methods include utilization of instrument fault detection, power plant modeling and process diagnostics. Advanced state estimation is applied to this area.  A large part of contemporary power engineering is the incorporation of renewable resource generation.

Electric Power Quality

Several projects are in progress in the area of electric power quality, including the use of the fast Fourier transform for data analysis, power conditioner design, harmonics, active filters, impact of power electronic loads on power systems, software development for power quality analysis, and state estimation.

Innovative Applications

Innovative research areas are under study at ASU, and students interested in advanced novel applications are invited to participate in this work. These areas include: applications of the global positioning satellite, generation of very high power pulses in military applications, advanced mathematical and numerical methods, high performance computing applied to power systems, stochastic programming for power systems optimization problems, chaos theory, artificial neural networks, electric energy markets, design of statistical experiments in high voltage engineering, and NiCd battery systems.

Renewable Resources

The group at ASU has recently been involved with several new projects dealing with the interface of renewable energy resources into the electric grid. These projects specifically deal with solar and wind resources, integration of renewables in terms of planning and operations, and long-term effects of policy on transmission expansion and generation investment. Current projects examine the impact of high penetration of these resources on power system performance and reliability at the distribution and transmission level.

signal processing and communications

Revised   4/10/2013

OVERVIEW

The School of Electrical, Computer and Energy Engineering at Arizona State University offers instruction in the related areas of signal processing and communications systems (SP/Comm) at the graduate level. Courses are also offered for beginning graduate students in the SP/Comm area to bridge any gaps that might exist between their undergraduate course work and the 500-level offerings at ASU. Students may choose from among several 500-level courses ranging from offerings primarily intended for first-year students to special topics courses designed to acquaint advanced graduate students with research topics of current interest.

Sample MSE iPOS Signal processing and communications

COMMUNICATIONS COURSES

EEE 455 – Communication Systems
EEE 459 – Communication Networks
EEE 551 – Information Coding Theory
EEE 552 – Digital Communications
EEE 553 – Coding and Cryptography
EEE 557 –Broadband Networks
EEE 558 – Wireless Communications

SIGNAL PROCESSING COURSES

EEE 404 – Real-Time Digital Signal Processing
EEE 407 – Digital Signal Processing
EEE 505 – Time-Frequency Signal Processing
EEE 506 – Digital Spectral Analysis
EEE 507 – Multidimensional Signal Processing
EEE 508 – Digital Image Processing and Compression
EEE 509 – DSP Algorithms and Software  (online only)
EEE 510 – Multimedia Signal Processing (online only)
EEE 550 – Transform Theory and Applications
EEE 554 – Random Signal Theory
EEE 555 – Modeling and Performance Analysis
EEE 556 – Detection and Estimation Theory
EEE 557 – Broadband Networks
EEE 558 – Wireless Communications
EEE 581 – Filtering and Stochastic Processes
EEE 606 – Adaptive Signal Processing
EEE 607 – Speech Coding for Multimedia Communications

SPECIAL TOPICS COURSES–EEE 598

Advanced Topics in Wireless Communications and Networking
Multicarrier Communication Systems and OFDM
Signal Processing for Wireless Communications
Time-Varying Signal Processing
Speech Recognition Algorithms
Space time coding
Advanced Linear Algebra and Optimization

EEE 598 – Linear Algebra and Optimization
EEE 598 – Advanced Topics in Wireless & Internet Security
EEE 598 – Network information theory
EEE 598 – Resource Allocation in Communication Networks
EEE 598 – network information theory
EEE 598 –Multimedia and Quality of Service Nets
EEE 598 – Biomedical Image Processing
EEE 598 – Advanced Topics in Wireless & Internet Security
EEE 598 – Computer Vision and Imaging

solid state electronics

Revised 5/1/2013

OVERVIEW

The solid-state electronics curriculum includes five upper-division undergraduate and 21 graduate courses in the areas of semiconductor devices and materials, micro-electro-mechanical-systems (MEMS), characterization, semiconductor optoelectronics, photonic and photovoltaic devices, solar energy, semiconductor processing, nanoelectronics, nanophotonics, molecular electronics, transport and computational electronics, as well as occasional specialty courses. Several classes offer a hands-on laboratory experience during which students work in a cleanroom environment and other specialized labs using industry-standard fabrication and characterization tools.

Many of our Master’s and Ph.D.  students are supported by research assistantships sponsored by industry or federal agencies such as the National Science Foundation, NASA, DARPA, research offices of the Air Force, Army and Navy, the National Institutes of Health among others. Graduate students who elect to complete a research thesis will often work with solid state faculty as part of large projects consisting of multi-university teams such as the QESST Engineering Research Center (http://qesst.asu.edu) sponsored by the National Science Foundation and the U.S. Department of Energy. Graduate experimental research projects in solid state electronics are enabled by the ASU NanoFab (http://more.engineering.asu.edu/nanofab/) which serves as the southwest regional node of the National Nanotechnology Infrastructure Network (www.nnin.org)

Sample MSE iPOS Solid-state electronics

ELECTIVE COURSES

EEE 434 – Quantum Mechanics for Engineers
EEE 435 – Fundamentals of CMOS and MEMS
EEE 436 – Fundamentals of Solid-State Devices
EEE 437 – Optoelectronics
EEE 439 – Semiconductor Facilities and Cleanroom Practices
EEE 498 – Solar Energy

GRADUATE COURSES

EEE 528 – Introduction to Microelectromechanical Systems
EEE 530 – Advanced Silicon Processing
EEE 531 – Semiconductor Device Theory I
EEE 532 – Semiconductor Device Theory II
EEE 533 – Semiconductor Process/Device Simulation
EEE 534 – Semiconductor Transport
EEE 535 – Electron Transport in Nanostructures
EEE 536 – Semiconductor Characterization
EEE 537 – Fundamentals of Optoelectronics
EEE 538 – Optoelectronic Devices
EEE 539 – Introduction to Solid-State Electronics
EEE 565 – Solar Cells
EEE 598 – Advanced Biosensor Concepts
EEE 598 – Advanced Device Modeling
EEE 598 – Advanced pn Junctions
EEE 598 – Personal Sensors for Mobile Health Applications
EEE 598 – Defects in Semiconductors
EEE 598 – Nanoscale Fabrication and Characterization
EEE 598 – Nano-Micro Electromechanical Sensors
EEE 598 – Optoelectronic Material Growth and Device Processing
EEE 598 – Modeling of Optoelectronic Devices
EEE 598 – Molecular Electronics
EEE 598 – Nano/Micro Electromechanical Sensors
EEE 598 – Nanophotonics
EEE 598 – Optical Spectroscopy of Semiconductor Materials and Heterostructures
EEE 598 – Power Electronic Devices
EEE 598 – Photovoltaic Manufacturing
EEE 598 – Photovoltaic Optics
EEE 598 – Photovoltaic Systems
EEE 598 – Technology Computer Aided Design
EEE 631 – Advanced Optoelectronics
EEE 731 – Advanced MOS Devices
EEE 791 – Quantum Transport in Semiconductors

arts, media and engineering

OVERVIEW

The School of Electrical, Computer and Energy Engineering at Arizona State University in collaboration with the Herberger College of Fine Arts (HFCA) has established a concentration in Arts, Media and Engineering. This concentration is available both for master’s and doctoral programs (not available for M.S.E or M.Eng.). Students admitted in this program take two-thirds of their course, research, and thesis credits from the School of Electrical, Computer and Energy Engineering and one-third of the credits from the Arts, Media and Engineering program.  For more information on the Arts, Media and Engineering concentration visit the Frequently Asked Questions about the ECEE + AME Concentration page.

EE COURSES FOR THE AME CONCENTRATION

Students can take courses from the following EE subjects to satisfy the EE portion of the AME concentration. Other EE courses could be taken with the approval of the AME concentration advisor.

EEE 407 – Digital Signal Processing
EEE 455 – Communication Systems
EEE 459 – Communication Networks
EEE 480 – Controls Systems
EEE 506 – Digital Spectral Analysis
EEE 505 – Time-varying Signal Processing
EEE 507 – Multidimensional Signal Processing
EEE 508 – Digital Image Processing and Compression
EEE 550 – Transform Theory and Applications
EEE 551 – Information Coding Theory
EEE 552 – Digital Communications
EEE 553 – Coding and Cryptography
EEE 554 – Random Signal Theory
EEE 555 – Modeling and Performance Analysis
EEE 556 – Detection and Estimation Theory
EEE 558 – Wireless Communications
EEE 581 – Filtering and Stochastic Processes
EEE 606 – Adaptive Signal Processing
EEE 607 – Speech Coding for Multimedia Communications

AME and EE Thesis/Research Credits (M.S.)

EEE 592 – EE Research
EEE 599 – EE Thesis
AME 592 – AME Research
AME 599– AME Thesis

AME and EE Dissertation/Research Credits (Ph.D.)

EEE 792 – Research
EEE 799 – Dissertation
AME 792 – Research
AME 799 – Dissertation

RESEARCH ACTIVITIES

The Arts, Media and Engineering program (AME, http://ame.asu.edu ) represents an ambitious interdisciplinary research community at ASU that is focused on the parallel development of media hardware, software, content and theory. The AME is a joint effort of the Herberger College of Fine Arts (HCFA) and of the Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering. AME research addresses the discontinuum that exists between media content and media technologies, through a paradigm shift in media and arts training. The objective is to produce a new kind of hybrid graduate students who draw their creativity from the arts and their methodology from engineering sciences. AME trains students to integrate principles of DSP and multimedia computing with artistic ideas and objectives, with the goal of enabling new paradigms of human-machine experience that directly address societal needs and facilitate knowledge.