Associate Professor Daniel Bliss works with students in his lab to confront both hardware and protocol design problems, essential for managing society’s increasingly diverse communication needs. Photographer: Nora Skrodenis/ASU

Associate Professor Daniel Bliss works with students in his lab to confront both hardware and protocol design problems, essential for managing society’s increasingly diverse communication needs. Photographer: Nora Skrodenis/ASU

How would we construct our wireless communications systems if we could start from scratch?

Decades of discovery in wireless communication have transformed society, but the journey has left us with much too rigid and fragile wireless systems.

“The current state of wireless communications is absolutely amazing, but also something of a mess,” says Associate Professor of electrical engineering Daniel Bliss.

But Bliss isn’t being critical without being proactive — and bold — in advancing research that aims to usher in a revolution for wireless communications.

His efforts are supported in part by a $2.1 million two-year grant from Google’s Advanced Technology and Projects group.

Google ATAP specializes in delivering results through high-risk, high-impact programs. Utilizing a model derived from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), each project operates on a strict two-year timeline and brings together teams of researchers from multiple institutions.

The team includes Professor Chaitali Chakrabarti and Assistant Professor Umit Ogras, both faculty members along with Bliss in the School of Electrical, Computer and Energy Engineering, one of the Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering, as well as collaborators at Google, Cornell University, the University of Southern California, Stanford University and more.

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