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Engineering | School of Electrical, Computer and Energy Engineering

ASU researcher earns Moore Inventor Fellowship with nanoparticle coating tool

ASU researcher earns Moore Inventor Fellowship with nanoparticle coating tool

Touchscreens repelling fingerprints, bandages inhibiting infection, home windows cleaning themselves, solar panels converting more sunlight to electricity — Zachary Holman is making ordinary surfaces extraordinary using nanoparticles.

Nanoparticles are microscopic pieces of material that are 1 to 100 nanometers in size (a sheet of paper is 100,000 nanometers thick). They can be applied to a variety of surfaces, allowing everyday objects to take on new properties, such as dirt-repelling and antibacterial behaviors. However, to take advantage of those properties, manufacturers need a way to attach the nanoparticles to those objects.

Holman, an Arizona State University assistant professor, has invented a tool that can spray a coating of nanoparticles onto glass and other surfaces. Holman received a Moore Inventor Fellowship for the invention’s potential. He is one of five recipients of the three-year, $825,000 fellowship from the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, which will support the continued research and entrepreneurship Holman started a decade ago.

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November 15, 2018