Graduate programs

ProgramDegreesLocationAvailable online
Arts, media and engineeringMS, PhDTempe
Computer engineeringMS, PhDTempe
Electrical engineeringMS/MSETempeYes (MSE)
Electrical engineeringMBA/MSEYes
Electrical engineeringPhDTempe
Robotics and autonomous systemsMSTempe
Sensor, signal & information processing certificateCertificateTempe
Nuclear power generation certificateCertificateTempeYes

Opportunities for study beyond the bachelor’s degree exist in several areas, including computer engineering, control systems, electromagnetics, antennas and microwave circuits, electronic and mixed-signal circuit design, electric power and energy systems, signal processing and communications, physical electronics and photonics and arts, media and engineering. Studies may lead to the degrees of master of science (MS) or the Master of Science in Engineering (MSE).

Students are involved in a variety of research activities and have access to state-of-the-art facilities, such as the electromagnetic anechoic chamber, the wireless communications lab and the integrated circuit fabrication clean room.

The ECEE’s programs are highly recognized for their exceptional quality. Online delivery of our master’s program was recently ranked #2 by U.S. News and World Report. Our commitment is to provide qualified students access to electrical engineering graduate programs valued by industry. 

Stephen M. Phillips

Professor and School Director

Admission information

Application deadlines

Fall Semester:

Preference is given to complete ECEE graduate applications received by December 31. Admission results should be available by March 1. Applications received after this preferred deadline will be considered.

Spring Semester:

Preference is given to complete ECEE graduate applications received by July 31. Admission results should be available by October 1. Applications received after this preferred deadline will be considered.

MSE Admission requirements
  • Students from US ABET-accredited undergraduate electrical engineering programs who wish to be considered for a master’s program must have a minimum GPA of 3.0 (on a four-point scale) in the last two years of undergraduate electrical engineering course work. After these degree requirements are verified, the GRE can be waived.
  • Students from non-US schools must have a minimum GPA of 3.5 (on a four-point scale) in the last two years of undergraduate electrical engineering course work or have graduated first class with distinction and must score 156  or higher on the quantitative section of the GRE General Test.
  • Students whose native language is not English must demonstrate proficiency in the English language by scoring at least 90 on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), or an overall band score of 6.5 on the International English Language Testing System (IELTS) exam, or an overall score of at least 60 on the Pearson Test of English (PTE).  International students seeking teaching assistantships must demonstrate proficiency in spoken English by scoring at least 24 on the speaking portion of the iBT or 50 on the ASU administered SPEAK Test.
  • Letters of recommendation are not required or permitted for master’s degree applications.
  • One page personal statement is required.

Learn more

PhD Admission requirements
  • Applicants with a master’s degree who wish to be considered for the doctoral program must have a minimum GPA of 3.5 (on a four-point scale) in their electrical engineering master’s program.
  • International applicants not from a US ABET accredited school must score 156 or higher on the quantitative section of the GRE General Test and must have a master’s degree.
  • Applicants without a master’s degree must have a minimum GPA of 3.6 (on a four-point scale) in the last two years of undergraduate course work and have graduated from a US ABET-accredited undergraduate program. Strong students from reputable international programs may be considered for the direct PhD program if they have a PhD graduate advisory committee chair that will support them with at least a 0.25 RA position.
  • Students whose native language is not English must demonstrate proficiency in the English language by scoring at least 90 on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), or an overall band score of 6.5 on the International English Language Testing System (IELTS) exam, or an overall score of at least 60 on the Pearson Test of English (PTE).  International students seeking teaching assistantships must demonstrate proficiency in spoken English by scoring at least 24 on the speaking portion of the iBT or 50 on the ASU administered SPEAK Test.
  • Three letters of recommendation and a personal statement are required. They are part of the online application package. Your resume is not required.

Learn more

Next steps after admission

Congratulations on being admitted to the one of our programs!

Please review the following webpages:

ECEE Student Handbook

Graduate Next Steps for Enrollment

I-20 processing instructions (Including information on how to submit your financial guarantee form and proof of finances)

Measles, Mumps, and Rubella (MMR) vaccination requirements

Funding information from the Electrical, Computing, and Energy Engineering department

ASU Financial Aid Office information

 

If you cannot attend in the semester that you were admitted to, you can defer your admission by one semester. Please refer to this webpage for information on how to defer or cancel your admission.

Financial support

Various forms of financial support are available to new and continuing graduate students including teaching and research assistantships and fellowships. These opportunities may be accessed through each academic unit as well as individual faculty members.

Graduate Student Information

Finding a PhD Faculty Advisor

A guide to selecting the right faculty advisor. Adapted from “Selecting the right Ph.D. advisor: A guide, by assistant professor Zachary C. Holman.

What’s at stake?

Choosing a PhD advisor is a big decision. A good advisor will provide you with steady funding, teach you new skills, bring out your best, and coach you toward your future career. Both you and your advisor usually only have one chance to pick correctly and switching can be a big setback for you. This short guide, which discusses five aspects to consider when picking an advisor, is intended to help you make the right choice.

Funding and field of interest

Look for an advisor who has a funded project in need of a student. Once you narrow down the faculty that could be a good match, consult their website to see the topics they are focusing on at the moment.

You will spend the next four to six years studying the minutia of the research topic that you and your advisor establish—make sure that it interests you. Ask your advisor to sell you on his or her research.

Professional relationship and managing expectations

Make sure that you can communicate effectively with your future advisor, and that you are comfortable being vulnerable in his or her presence (e.g., when asking a “stupid” question).

You and your advisor should share similar expectations for your PhD tenure. Find out how many papers you are expected to publish, if you must obtain a master’s degree before earning your PhD, whether you will present at weekly meetings, and if you must perform other services (e.g., maintaining equipment or advising undergraduates).

Future prospects

While few doctoral students end up working on the exact same topic as their dissertation post-graduation, they often find success in a related field. If you intend to enter industry, aim to gain skills during your PhD that you can use afterwards.

The first time you meet with your potential advisor, ask for copies of his or her recent publications, meet with current students, and attend a group meeting if possible.